Myriorama

Date: 
February 2012
Location: 
Sunderland , Crowtree Leisure Centre
Client: 
Sunderland University
Production: 
Grit & Pearl
Budget: 
£35,000

Large scale drawing for a set of panels that can be put together in a number of variations. The drawing was intended to be lazer cut in powder coated and stainless steel with pin holes back lit. Here it is realised in printed form with reflective adhered circles. 

(Greek;myrio=10,000 times, high number: horama=that which is seen)
(Vertical montage of a segmented panorama-literally the many thousands view) taken from the catalogue to Eyes, Lies and Illusions at the Haywood Gallery, South Bank Centre London

Myriorama is made for and taken directly from Sunderland. Hidden within the fantastical and imaginary cityscape are layers of images collected directly from Sunderland or associated with Sunderland. Stuffed animals from the museum find new life as they stroll across buildings from the past and present. References are made to elements of industrial heritage, as well as the historical architecture and leisurely aspects of life in Sunderland.  

In places images are deliberate; provoking connections and thoughts, in contrast other relationships are accidental and ambiguous inviting the audience to create their own connections. The drawing changes; it changes as the panels are rotated 180 degrees creating new connection, images and suggestions. It also changes from day to night and as the light around the drawing changes, the silver line reflects the life within the city back and the perforation reveal the activity and light behind the boards again creating new images and connections. 

Myriorama takes the ordinary, the everyday stuff of a city and weaves it together to create something extraordinary. It references the potential of random events, occurrences and the diversity of large cities. It also references the role of familiarity in our everyday environments. Here the familiar is taken creating the unfamiliar and requiring the audience to seek out familiarity and questions its new context.